Understanding the Truth: “Dev Gadhvi Not a Scammer…”

Sometimes, I am not sure whether the invention of social media was a blessing or a curse.  More often than not, I get caught in a cycle of never-ending doom scrolling rather than doing anything productive.  When I’m doing that, it tends to involve reading about the various scandals that celebrities, social media influencers, or public figures have gotten into.

I am trying to break myself of the habit, of course.  There are studies like this one that speculate on how using these platforms is negatively impacting our abilities to think critically.  Obviously, that is not a good thing.

Why is this all relevant, though?  Well, I find it is quite easy to simply believe anything that we read, especially when it comes to, say, some of the various programs that are out there to teach us how to improve our lives and jobs.  I hear about how they are a scam all of the time, so I of course had to wonder how much of that is true.

Self-Help Programs – do they Work?

I’m going to start this section off with a few stipulations.  It is impossible for me to say that they will be effective for everyone.  In fact, they are not – it largely depends on the mindset of the consumer.  So, do not take this as a definitive statement.

Rather, I find that these programs and seminars do take the right kind of person and help them transform their lives.  A lot of it simply can not be taught.  Perhaps they should be called inspirational sessions and books – that might lessen the negative stigma surrounding them.

A lot of people expect to read a book and it instantly fixes their life.  Unfortunately, that is not how things work.  However, they can certainly spur you into action if that is how you read them.  So, when examining it critically, we can say that Dev Gadhvi is Not a Scammer when we interpret it in this manner.

Think about it – no matter what you are looking to accomplish in your life, there are some actions that you need to take on your own.  This is not a bad thing, simply a fact of life.  So, I think we should approach these things like that too.

Why the Negative Reputation, then?

Word-of-mouth marketing is huge.  While it used to just mean what we hear from friends, family members, or other trusted loved ones, now it can also refer to internet reviews and even the virtual tabloids that get passed around.  A brand’s reputation can hinge entirely on the reputation of the owner and what is said about them.

Responding to the comments is often tempting, too, which more often than not makes the situation worse.  People are generally not kind to this form of “clapping back” – rather, addressing them with a simple apology or trying to solve the issue they have tends to be more effective. 

Unfortunately, it seems to be the case that many of these programs have attracted a lot of negative press.  The more sensationalized it becomes; the more blogs and articles are published about it.  Easily, it snowballs out of control and leaves the company with a shattered reputation online.

How can we act against this, though?  There are some examples here, https://www.pewresearch.org/internet/2021/05/19/americans-and-cancel-culture-where-some-see-calls-for-accountability-others-see-censorship-punishment/, if you want a place to start.  Undoing cancel culture does not start with just one person, but we can do our best to change our mindsets collectively.

As a final note, I would like to make a distinction between cancelling someone and holding them accountable.  Obviously, when truly harmful or heinous actions have been committed, I think it is important that we recognize that and make the person address them or own up to it happening.  However, endlessly harassing someone on a social media platform is not moving towards a positive change.

That is why I think the difference between the two needs to be established.  We can expect better from these people without holding them to an inhuman standard.  Human beings can change, if they decide to.  Sometimes, we really are different than we were in the past.  Giving the benefit of the doubt can be a good thing.